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Min Diameter builds. 38mm and 54mm
#31
Wow. The I216 should put that up around 13-14k or more. The J maybe not as high depending if it flies straight. Good luck.
I may be there on Sunday... will stop by if I make it out.
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#32
(04-08-2016, 11:31 AM)MarkH Wrote: Wow.  The I216 should put that up around 13-14k or more.  The J maybe not as high depending if it flies straight.  Good luck.
I may be there on Sunday... will stop by if I make it out.

The I216 sims to around 15k. The J94 sims to around 16k. After today I decided I will only do the J94 if there is enough time on Sunday. But I already have the I216 ready to go for Sunday. In just going to have to put my Frenzy XL up first thing in the morning.

NAR# 98194
Level 1: CTI I-216, 3,043'
Level 2: CTI K-740, 5,999'

Personal altitude record: 12,400' CTI L395
2014 total impulse: 9,018.2 Ns (76% M)
2015 total impulse: 7,171.7 Ns (40% M)
2016 total impulse: 18,664.2 Ns (91% N)
2017 total impulse: 8,281.1 Ns (80% M)
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#33
It took three trips out to the launch tower to get the Av-bay working. But finally, once I had a tracking signal and continuity beeps from the Raven, I put the igniter in and retreated to the flight line.

   

   

As the LCO was counting down I could only think about my two worst fears for the flight, a shred, or I lose the vehicle completely.

When the LCO hit the button to ignite the I216, SkyPunch left the tower in a hurry, ready to set a new personal altitude record for me.

   

The motor however, had other plans. A pop could be heard and my heart sank. The dreaded CATO. The nose cone popped off the top and the vehicle continued upwards for another 20 or 30 feet as the motor was skywriting beside it.

   

I was devastated. I thought all the hard work I poured into this rocket was lost. I followed the line out to where I though the motor landed and was lucky to stumble upon it about 100 feet away from the launch pad. Closer inspection showed the forward bulkhead of the motor liner blew out completely, allowing the motor to burn from the top end.

   

Then I turned on the tracker so I could at least find that. I followed the signal for about another 100 feet and found the entire vehicle in tact and ready to fly again (after a bit of prep work). There was only some slight cosmetic wear to the carbon body tube, a burn mark from the motor burning from the top end. Friction fit saved my rocket.

Since the motor blew out from the top end, the force pushed back on the motor, kicking it out the back of the rocket and saving it from any major damage. Further inspection revealed the bottom of the Av-bay to be scorched from the CATO'd motor.

   

   

I'll post video as soon as I can.

NAR# 98194
Level 1: CTI I-216, 3,043'
Level 2: CTI K-740, 5,999'

Personal altitude record: 12,400' CTI L395
2014 total impulse: 9,018.2 Ns (76% M)
2015 total impulse: 7,171.7 Ns (40% M)
2016 total impulse: 18,664.2 Ns (91% N)
2017 total impulse: 8,281.1 Ns (80% M)
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#34
Ah, that bites. I was hoping to see some serious altitude. At least it will fly again. Cool tower design by the way.
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#35
(04-12-2016, 04:40 AM)MarkH Wrote: Ah, that bites.  I was hoping to see some serious altitude.  At least it will fly again.  Cool tower design by the way.

I'm happy to have gotten everything back, even without the serious altitude. Next time I make it somewhere that can support the altitude I want, I will try again.

The tower does not belong to me so I cannot take any credit for it whatsoever. But t is a very nice tower and I would like to use t again for my next attempt.

NAR# 98194
Level 1: CTI I-216, 3,043'
Level 2: CTI K-740, 5,999'

Personal altitude record: 12,400' CTI L395
2014 total impulse: 9,018.2 Ns (76% M)
2015 total impulse: 7,171.7 Ns (40% M)
2016 total impulse: 18,664.2 Ns (91% N)
2017 total impulse: 8,281.1 Ns (80% M)
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