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4" Frenzy XL
#61
(08-13-2016, 07:13 PM)T34zac Wrote: Ok so I've flown this one more time on the L910 this year. It was back over a month ago, but YouTube says my computer is too old to use it. Therefore I can't upload video until I get myself something more modern than a 2009 iMac.

But the flight was nice even though at apogee the wind stopped blowing so it landed in the woods that I was trying to avoid. There was an epic recovery effort of over three hours trying to get it out of two trees about 50' up. Oh and we crossed a river to get to it.

But the main reason for this post, I've decided that LDRS in 2017 will be a great time to get into M power. That's right, going for an L3 cert with this. The motor will be a CTI M840 white longburn. This was not my original plan for this rocket, or for getting an L3 cert in general. But my dad of all people (who actually just certified L2 the other week) has convinced me that I should go for an L3 attempt. If all goes according to this new plan, the M840 should take my Frenzy to about 15,500', which would be another personal record set by this rocket.

(10-25-2015, 11:14 PM)T34zac Wrote: Also, by no means is this an L3 cert rocket. I'm saving that for something even crazier. Mainly because I want to fly an N for a cert.

Just realizing now that this is literally in the first post of this thread... Well I guess I'm going back on my words...
_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Hi Tom,
  Sorry to hear about the loss of the frenzy. Your plans for a N flight cert 3 is ambitious & I look forward to hearing  more details.
Regards,Fred
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#62
(08-13-2016, 09:49 PM)FMarvinS Wrote:
(08-13-2016, 07:13 PM)T34zac Wrote: Ok so I've flown this one more time on the L910 this year. It was back over a month ago, but YouTube says my computer is too old to use it. Therefore I can't upload video until I get myself something more modern than a 2009 iMac.

But the flight was nice even though at apogee the wind stopped blowing so it landed in the woods that I was trying to avoid. There was an epic recovery effort of over three hours trying to get it out of two trees about 50' up. Oh and we crossed a river to get to it.

But the main reason for this post, I've decided that LDRS in 2017 will be a great time to get into M power. That's right, going for an L3 cert with this. The motor will be a CTI M840 white longburn. This was not my original plan for this rocket, or for getting an L3 cert in general. But my dad of all people (who actually just certified L2 the other week) has convinced me that I should go for an L3 attempt. If all goes according to this new plan, the M840 should take my Frenzy to about 15,500', which would be another personal record set by this rocket.

(10-25-2015, 11:14 PM)T34zac Wrote: Also, by no means is this an L3 cert rocket. I'm saving that for something even crazier. Mainly because I want to fly an N for a cert.

Just realizing now that this is literally in the first post of this thread... Well I guess I'm going back on my words...
_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Hi Tom,
  Sorry to hear about the loss of the frenzy. Your plans for a N flight cert 3 is ambitious & I look forward to hearing  more details.
Regards,Fred
The Frenzy is not lost. It just landed in the woods and was retrieved. I need to do some minor repairs but it is otherwise undamaged. The plan to fly an N for an L3 cert is no longer going to happen. The Frenzy will fly on an M840 at the next LDRS for my attempt.

NAR# 98194
Level 1: CTI I-216, 3,043'
Level 2: CTI K-740, 5,999'

Personal altitude record: 12,400' CTI L395
2014 total impulse: 9,018.2 Ns (76% M)
2015 total impulse: 7,171.7 Ns (40% M)
2016 total impulse: 18,664.2 Ns (91% N)
2017 total impulse: 8,281.1 Ns (80% M)
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#63
Are there any rules against flying an already built and flown rocket for an L3 attempt? I guess it shouldn't matter, as long as the build is documented, and the L3CC or TAP is ok with it.
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#64
(08-14-2016, 03:18 PM)MarkH Wrote: Are there any rules against flying an already built and flown rocket for an L3 attempt? I guess it shouldn't matter, as long as the build is documented, and the L3CC or TAP is ok with it.

I don't think there is. I believe a lot of people usually fly their L3 rockets with an L2 motor to make sure everything works. But I wil run that by Robert DeHate first.

NAR# 98194
Level 1: CTI I-216, 3,043'
Level 2: CTI K-740, 5,999'

Personal altitude record: 12,400' CTI L395
2014 total impulse: 9,018.2 Ns (76% M)
2015 total impulse: 7,171.7 Ns (40% M)
2016 total impulse: 18,664.2 Ns (91% N)
2017 total impulse: 8,281.1 Ns (80% M)
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#65
The TAP/L3CC has to trust that the rocket is safe, flyable, and recoverable. I had Robert as my L3CC, and when I asked him how much he wanted to be involved in my design and build, he said, "As much as you want me to be."

You may find others that are more of a control freak and want to see every component before it is glued in. Others just want to get a sense that you know what you are doing, but not get in your way.

Bottom line, though, is that in order to get the L3, you have to launch on an M, N, or O motor and safely recover it, with redundant deployment. Everything up to the moment of that flight is really between you and your mentor. The only thing (at least for NAR) that gets turned in is your flight report and checklist. You can have the greatest plan document ever written, but all that does is get you to the pad.
John S.
NAR #96911
TRA #15253
MDRA
Level 1, 2014-Mar-15 -- Aerotech Sumo, H133BS
Level 2, 2014-Jun-21 -- Giant Leap Vertical Assault, J240RL
Level 3, 2016-03-12 -- MAC Performance Radial Flyer, M1101WH, 13,028 feet
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#66
Usually the intent to attain L3 is made before the build, approved, then flown on the L2 motor for test flight, then the L3 motor for cert. also may want to talk to the LDRS host club (MDRA) as the waiver for LDRS has been set to 14,000 MSL
http://ldrs36.org/launchsite/
1500ft isn't that big of a difference, all will depend on weather, wind, ceiling and whether or not higher call ins will be available. Just don't want you to buy the motor only to be told they don't want you to bust the waiver.
Dave Greger L3
NAR# 95846
MDRA #65

Hollie L1
NAR# 99687
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#67
(08-15-2016, 01:59 PM)dgreger Wrote: Usually the intent to attain L3 is made before the build, approved, then flown on the L2 motor for test flight, then the L3 motor for cert. also may want to talk to the LDRS host club (MDRA) as the waiver for LDRS has been set to 14,000 MSL
http://ldrs36.org/launchsite/
1500ft isn't that big of a difference, all will depend on weather, wind, ceiling and whether or not higher call ins will be available. Just don't want you to buy the motor only to be told they don't want you to bust the waiver.


I'm aware that L3 intent is usually made before construction, but I did document the build of this rocket and Robert told me there is a chance if he deems the material sufficient. Otherwise I will have to build something else and wait even longer so I can obtain the funds for rocket and motor.

Didn't realize the waiver was set to 14k. That's a bummer. If that's the case, and they can't call in for higher, I may just wait until the next red glare. But 14k limits my other plans for LDRS, two MD flights, one 29mm and one 38mm, planned to break 15k on I motors.

(08-15-2016, 09:25 AM)Bat-mite Wrote: The TAP/L3CC has to trust that the rocket is safe, flyable, and recoverable.  I had Robert as my L3CC, and when I asked him how much he wanted to be involved in my design and build, he said, "As much as you want me to be."

You may find others that are more of a control freak and want to see every component before it is glued in.  Others just want to get a sense that you know what you are doing, but not get in your way.

Bottom line, though, is that in order to get the L3, you have to launch on an M, N, or O motor and safely recover it, with redundant deployment.  Everything up to the moment of that flight is really between you and your mentor.  The only thing (at least for NAR) that gets turned in is your flight report and checklist.  You can have the greatest plan document ever written, but all that does is get you to the pad.

Well my Frenzy meets all the requirements I'm aware of. It's just up to Robert whether he'll let it go or not. I did build it with the idea that it will be able to take the hardest hitting motors it can fit all day long without breaking a sweat. But of course, as I said, it's up to Robert at this point.

I'm currently putting the paperwork together, but will be some time as I do have family stuff and work stuff over the next couple of weeks, but I hope to have the paperwork to Robert by the end of next week.

NAR# 98194
Level 1: CTI I-216, 3,043'
Level 2: CTI K-740, 5,999'

Personal altitude record: 12,400' CTI L395
2014 total impulse: 9,018.2 Ns (76% M)
2015 total impulse: 7,171.7 Ns (40% M)
2016 total impulse: 18,664.2 Ns (91% N)
2017 total impulse: 8,281.1 Ns (80% M)
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