Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
CMoG
#1
I went to the Corning Museum of Glass today. Wasn't expecting rocketry, but here we are.

[Image: img_7599.jpg]

[Image: img_7604.jpg]
Rich Holmes
Camillus, NY
Secretary / newsletter editor
Syracuse Rocket Club

http://richsrockets.wordpress.com
Reply
#2
Even in guided missiles, making the nose cones is one of the hardest parts!
Reply
#3
Interesting. I had wrongly assumed the ceramic used was Alumina (Aluminium Oxide).
Never heard of 'ceramming' glass before. I found this Corning Patent application that has a basic explanation:
http://www.google.co.ve/patents/US4277522

Quote:The term "glass-ceramic" refers to a polycrystalline ceramic prepared by the controlled crystalization of a glass in situ. The invention of such materials has enabled the formation of intricately-shaped polycrystalline articles by forming "green glass" into the desired shape and thereafter ceramming the green glass article to convert it to a glass-ceramic. The ceramming step conventionally involves heating the green glass article to an elevated temperature, e.g. a temperature in the range of about 650°-800° C., to cause nucleation or the formation of nuclei and subsequently heating the article to a higher temperature, e.g. a temperature in the range of about 800°-1175° C. to cause crystallization and growth of crystals. The resultant glass-ceramic material is known for its good mechanical and thermal durability.
AMRS #54
WARS #24
Reply
#4
Cool stuff.
Member of MDRA, NAR and NARHAMS;
Level-2 certified but mostly fly G and under;
Volunteer compiler of manufacturer's news for ROCKETS Magazine.
Reply
#5
CorningWare was basically the same stuff. See Pyroceram and Glass-ceramic in Wikipedia.
Rich Holmes
Camillus, NY
Secretary / newsletter editor
Syracuse Rocket Club

http://richsrockets.wordpress.com
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)