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Blenders motor retention?
#1
I picked up a pair of Estes Blenders and didn't realize until I'd opened it they're designed to spit their motors. Our club doesn't allow that at their launches.

Has anyone built these to retain their motors? E.g. drill relief holes in the nose cone (how big? how many?) or use plugged motors, and secure the motor with tape? Do they still recover okay?
Rich Holmes
Camillus, NY
Secretary / newsletter editor
Syracuse Rocket Club

http://richsrockets.wordpress.com
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#2
Is there a way to tape a streamer to the motor casing?

Also, is there a specific reason why the club forbids this?

I admit, I am not in favor of a design that requires the spent motor to be ejected in order for it to work.
Dave Brunsting
L2 - NAR and TRA
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#3
Our launch site is a hay field. The landlord is understandably reluctant to include spent motor casings in his product.
Rich Holmes
Camillus, NY
Secretary / newsletter editor
Syracuse Rocket Club

http://richsrockets.wordpress.com
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#4
As a farmer and landowner that clubs fly off of, I can understand, BUT... Seems like a rather small chance of that happening, or of it even being discovered if it DID, and even less likely that it could cause a problem. Cows wouldn't eat the casing and even if they did, it'd go straight through. Kraft paper casings will break down in about a year anyway (ask me how I know). I guess if he's selling top-end hay for those fussy horse nuts, I could see his point a little better. The odds of a casing being picked up during the process of making hay is slim to none... the mower would tend to sift it out of the cut forage, (or else cut it up and if it's a conditioner, crush it in the crimping rolls or smash it in the conditioner impellers. If the hay is tedded, the scattering of the forage would tend to cause it to separate from the forage and drop to the soil surface to decompose... if it's just left flat to dry and then raked, the raking process also tends to lift, fluff, and turn the hay as it moves it sideways into a windrow, which tends to let heavier stuff like clods of dirt, rocks, or spent motor casings drop out of the hay... then the baler pickup again lifts and fluffs the hay as it pulls it into the baler, which again tends to allow heavier stuff to drop out of the windrow, especially if it's on bottom.

Finally, it would seem to me he'd have bigger worries. Having cattle grazing the launching field, after one particular launch I picked up an entire handful of spent ignitor wires laying on the ground around where the pads had been located... carried it home and disposed of it, and had a talk with the club advisor and membership about the importance of keeping the ignitor wires off the ground so the animals wouldn't eat them while grazing... Now they put a five gallon bucket for trash wire at the pads... problem solved. Of course I also picked up about 30 Estes ignitor plugs from off the ground within about a five to ten foot radius of the pads as well... again those will drop to the soil surface and wouldn't make it into hay, but they won't decompose very quickly at all due to their size/surface area ratio... fortunately they're small and should be trampled down into the soil over time. I also picked up about a pocketful of spent Estes "toilet paper" wadding. That would be FAR, FAR more likely to end up in hay... of course it's not a HUGE deal, as the stuff WILL break down and decompose after some wind and rain works it down to the soil surface, but if it's hung up on grass where it can dry in the sun and wind, that process can take a lot longer and it can ride through hay equipment with the forage... if it lands on very short previously cut forage that is in short regrowth, the forage will grow over it, and the moisture and humidity in close proximity to the ground will tend to cause it to decompose quickly. Personally I prefer "dog barf" type paper insulation for wadding for this reason, but I don't object to folks using Estes style toilet paper type wadding... In fact I like to pick the stuff up because it CAN be reused a few times, until it's too full of holes and too charred to continue...

Just sayin'....

Later! OL JR Smile
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#5
Rich, first, kudos to you for trying to play by the rules!

Second, I've built these without motor retention, but I expect that they would still recover OK with motor retention, as they are just not that heavy.

If you can get your hands on the A10-PT motors then you are all set.

If not, I would suggest using a paper punch to put holes around the top of the BT, one between each set of "fins". Coat the inside of the BT and NC with epoxy or something else fireproof, and do the same on the fins and top around the vent holes. I would also still expect you will still see some blackening/streaking around the vents, based on my own somewhat limited experience with vent holes. If you have some 1.75" motor hooks you could use those in place of tape.
Bill Cooper
NAR #97213
L1: NARAM 56, 2x Upscale Fliskits Corona
L2: Oct. 2015, Wildman Interceptor A.A.D. 98
Member of UROC, former member of NOVAAR and NARHAMS
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#6
(12-17-2015, 09:45 AM)Rich Holmes Wrote: I picked up a pair of Estes Blenders and didn't realize until I'd opened it they're designed to spit their motors. Our club doesn't allow that at their launches.

Has anyone built these to retain their motors? E.g. drill relief holes in the nose cone (how big? how many?) or use plugged motors, and secure the motor with tape? Do they still recover okay?

Fly 'em on booster motors. No worries. Smile
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#7
What's an "Estes Blender"?
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