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Punisher 4 Kit Bash - Minimum Diameter Build
#31
Hey look, there's my rocket up in a tree.


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#32
Here we go.  3,  2,  1... ignition

The rod was angled pretty well, but the rocket had a mind of its own and corrected itself to fly straight up.  At the top it arced in the south direction, drifting behind the flight line and to the southeast

It landed by the edge of the corn planted to the right of the road you drive in on. Unfortunately it landed about 50 ft up in the trees, with the fin can way up in the canopy, and the nose cone and AV bay hanging down.

With the help of a club member named Bill  (who's last name I don't recall) we were able to hook it with the club's 50 ft telescoping pole. After much effort we won the tug-o-war and the tree lost, eventually coughing up the rocket

Here are the AV bay internals, and motor retention (friction fit).

The Aerotech K650T put it up to 9397 ft, according to GPS.

.....

post recovery pic:


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#33
Congrats on recovery from the rocket eating trees! By the way, which GPS unit are you using??

Fred,
L2, ICBM-Camden-SC
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#34
(08-03-2017, 09:33 PM)FMarvinS Wrote: Congrats on recovery from the rocket eating trees! By the way, which GPS unit are you using??

Fred,
L2, ICBM-Camden-SC

I was flying two GPS units. One was a DIY 900 Mhz transmitter developed by Derek on TRF described here:
http://www.rocketryforum.com/showthread....martphones

The other was a TeleGPS.  I was planning to make a cable to run from my Baefong radio to the iPhone, with the Pocket Packet app decoding the APRS  packets. But I  have yet to get around to making the cable so I was just decoding the audio signals holding the radio up to the iphone mic.  Suprisingly I was able to decode about half the packets coming through. I would have flown just the TeleGPS had I made a cable and a solid link to the radio, so I was more or less just flying it for kicks to see how well I could decode the audio.

I bought a 9 inch coupler  from Wildman for the AV bay in order to fit the longer antenna of the TeleGPS.

Turns out I had visual on the rocket most of the way down, then re acquired it when the main came out, so didn't really need the GPS to find the rocket, but both units worked well.
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#35
I appreciate the info Mark. I'm currently playing with a homebrew GPS and and am thinking of buying a Byonics unit for higher altitude flights. I'm using a Kenwood Th-72A HT as the receiver. When in APRS receive mode, the kenwood provides direction, altitude and distance from the APRS/GPS transmitter. For tracking purposes, I think that that alone would suffice unless one needs the cell phone map to check out terrain obstacles. What are your thoughts. Also, have you used open logger or z-logger to record NMEA data to use in Google maps to plot the trajectory?

Regards,
Fred, L2
ICBM, Camden, SC
KG4YGP
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#36
FMarvinS Wrote:I appreciate the info Mark. I'm currently playing with a homebrew GPS and and am thinking of buying a Byonics unit for higher altitude flights. I'm using a Kenwood Th-72A HT as the receiver. When in APRS receive mode, the kenwood provides direction, altitude and distance from the APRS/GPS transmitter. For tracking purposes, I think that that alone would suffice unless one needs the cell phone map to check out terrain obstacles. What are your thoughts. Also, have you used open logger or z-logger to record NMEA data to use in Google maps to plot the trajectory?

Regards,
Fred, L2
ICBM, Camden, SC
KG4YGP

Fred,  Yes I agree the Kenwood you have should be more than sufficient to find the rocket, and is better than the setup I have in that regard.  I usually use a garmin or a hiking app on my phone  to enter the final coordinates which gives me direction and distance,  since I haven't bothered pre-loading maps ahead of time and cell phone/data service at fields where I've flown is spotty at best.

I haven't used the programs you mention, but for plotting after the fact, I use the Ublox u-center software to receive the serial NMEA data coming from from my 900 Mhz unit, and save it to a file.  The software has a Google Earth plug-in, and I can play the file back after saving it, once I get an internet connection.

The TeleGPS retains 4 flights in memory, and the Altus Metrum software has a map feature that allows you to plot the flight from the TeleGPS. 

I've also used the Big Red Bee 70cm 100mW version.  It stores the flight in memory and downloads to a .kml format file.
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#37
Mark,

Thanks again for the info & update.

Regards,
Fred
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