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Scale Models: More Trouble than they are Worth?
#1
I have only done one scale model, selected at random, by skill level, and also to match the value of motors that I already had on hand.
it was the Semroc  "IRIS" and I learned abit.

I varied the paint scheme a little, to use what I had on hand, and I also discovered what an "Estes Smile" was, each time I launched it!

While I can see the appeal of making something that looks just like an original,  I think I have had my fill of a "Scale Model"  and I'm glad I tried one.


What do you guys see as the appeal of these things?  I REALLY loved the semroc instructions and quality materials!
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#2
Most all models will have some flight damage after a few flights.
This seems to happen more on scale models than sport rockets.

I think most modelers (with a few builds under their belt) should build and fly the Dr. Zooch Saturn V.
It's a well engineered kit with good detail and flys great! It does launch with the four (outside) nozzles on.
You'll have a Saturn V that won't break the bank and gets good altitudes for a BT-60 scale model.

I have two Zooch Saturn Vs. One for flight, the other second build is a shelf queen.

One thing about detailed models. After it lands, don't just pick it up and walk back.
Check the model for any small parts that may have broken off then scan the landing area.
You'll never find that small nozzle if you have to go back.
Hans "Chris" Michielssen
Old/New NAR # 19086 SR
www.modelrocketbuilding.blogspot.com

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#3
Photo 
It's amazing how readily the satellite stage of a Jupiter-C can disappear in just a couple inches of grass.  Angry

[Image: 2014-09-20-12-05-30.jpg]
Rich Holmes
Camillus, NY
Secretary / newsletter editor
Syracuse Rocket Club

http://richsrockets.wordpress.com
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#4
For some people, building is everything. They are into the hobby more for the building than the flying. So the tougher/more challenging the build, the more interested they are.

Some fliers are collectors, and they want to have a model of, say, every manned spacecraft, or every rocket built in 1965, or whatever.

I don't build scale, but I do think it is really cool to see a Saturn V or a Merc Redstone launch.

It's all about what do you like?
John S.
NAR #96911
TRA #15253
MDRA
Level 1, 2014-Mar-15 -- Aerotech Sumo, H133BS
Level 2, 2014-Jun-21 -- Giant Leap Vertical Assault, J240RL
Level 3, 2016-03-12 -- MAC Performance Radial Flyer, M1101WH, 13,028 feet
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#5
For me, I like flying/watching a model of something real.  I don't care how high it goes or what the motor size is, I like to see it and like to see the entire flight, recovery and not walk too far.  I've been doing this for long enough that I know I can build/prep/fly/recover a rocket without too much trouble, and get bored with making and finishing the same dang thing.  A scale or semi-scale model adds challenges in construction, detail and finishing, balancing and recovery that makes it more interesting for me.

Frank
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#6
(06-19-2015, 01:36 PM)burkefj Wrote: For me, I like flying/watching a model of something real.  I don't care how high it goes or what the motor size is, I like to see it and like to see the entire flight, recovery and not walk too far.  I've been doing this for long enough that I know I can build/prep/fly/recover a rocket without too much trouble, and get bored with making and finishing the same dang thing.  A scale or semi-scale model adds challenges in construction, detail and finishing, balancing and recovery that makes it more interesting for me.

Frank

Very well said.
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#7
(06-14-2015, 05:42 PM)Kirk G Wrote: I have only done one scale model, selected at random, by skill level, and also to match the value of motors that I already had on hand.
it was the Semroc  "IRIS" and I learned abit.

I varied the paint scheme a little, to use what I had on hand, and I also discovered what an "Estes Smile" was, each time I launched it!

While I can see the appeal of making something that looks just like an original,  I think I have had my fill of a "Scale Model"  and I'm glad I tried one.

What do you guys see as the appeal of these things?  I REALLY loved the semroc instructions and quality materials!

Kirk,

For me, the appeal is that I grew up during the highpoint of our space program.  So seeing a Saturn model launched just brings back fantastic memories.  I entered college studying Aerospace Engineering at the middle of the Apollo program, figuring I'd work for NASA when I graduated. (Didn't happen, the Apollo program got cancelled early.  But I did work at the Naval Weapons Center workign on Shrike and Sidewinder.  Cool, but not like working on the space program.

I've got a Saturn V that neds to get completed, I will start a Saturn 1B this winter as long tern project, and I am also about to get the Dr. Zooch Saturn 1 SA-5, which I think is one of the coolest looking rockets ever. And should be a relatively quick build.

There are two more kinds of builds that also are attractive to me.  First is building a classic, whether an old kit, or a clone of an oldie, and also upscales of classics.  I have a BT-60 based Orbital Transport done (1.68X), it just needs painting.

The great thing about this hobby is that you have so many choices, and scale is just one segment out of many.
Lee
NAR 55948, L2
In Build:   Estes Saturn 1B
Next: complete Semroc Mars Lander, upscaled Orbital Transport
In Finishing:  Interceptor-E 
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