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CinerocDV
#1
Estes Cineroc Nosecone? Or 3D Printed copy? One is real, two are copies... Which one is which...

Left to right... Option A, B, or C (below):

[Image: 19382410300_67776b852c.jpg]   [Image: 19382427498_69e5116812.jpg]  [Image: 19383846929_186d453f3b.jpg]
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NAR #100544

"The Guide says there is an art to flying", said Ford, "or rather a knack." 
"The knack lies in learning how to throw yourself at the ground and miss."

Launching is Optional... Landing? That Depends on Trees.

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#2
Now that classes are done, I'm working on the CinerocDV, and a clone of the Estes Omega (for the Community Competition). Today I worked on the nosecones (seen in the post above)... One is 40 years old (at least), and the other two are 3D printed copies. Not bad eh?
.
NAR #100544

"The Guide says there is an art to flying", said Ford, "or rather a knack." 
"The knack lies in learning how to throw yourself at the ground and miss."

Launching is Optional... Landing? That Depends on Trees.

Reply
#3
Nice. I reckon C is the original.
AMRS #54
WARS #24
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#4
My choice is C also, but Jim, they are great repros!
I have an original, never flown Cineroc, and Omega, which I need to build.
I had been toying with the idea of modifying the Cineroc for digital camera use, but in view of the 3 D printing available these days, I think I will go the route you did and leave the Cineroc itself untouched and for posterity.
The Omega on the other hand will be built and flown!
Greg Young - L3
TRA 00234
NAR 42065
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#5
My guesses - 
A and C are the 3D printed cones. 
B is the older balsa.
Hans "Chris" Michielssen
Old/New NAR # 19086 SR
www.modelrocketbuilding.blogspot.com

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#6
(07-10-2015, 10:21 AM)hcmbanjo Wrote: My guesses - 
A and C are the 3D printed cones. 
B is the older balsa.

All 3 are plastic...  I'm unaware of any authentic Cineroc model that used balsa.
.
NAR #100544

"The Guide says there is an art to flying", said Ford, "or rather a knack." 
"The knack lies in learning how to throw yourself at the ground and miss."

Launching is Optional... Landing? That Depends on Trees.

Reply
#7
(07-10-2015, 12:14 PM)K Wrote:
(07-10-2015, 10:21 AM)hcmbanjo Wrote: My guesses - 
A and C are the 3D printed cones. 
B is the older balsa.

All 3 are plastic...  I'm unaware of any authentic Cineroc model that used balsa.

Hey, you're right! I thought maybe there was a Semroc repro nose cone thrown in.

My revised guesses - 
A and C are the 3D printed cones. 
B is the original plastic.
Hans "Chris" Michielssen
Old/New NAR # 19086 SR
www.modelrocketbuilding.blogspot.com

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#8
(07-10-2015, 08:38 AM)Greg Young Wrote: My choice is C also, but Jim, they are great repros!
I have an original, never flown Cineroc, and Omega, which I need to build.
I had been toying with the idea of modifying the Cineroc for digital camera use, but in view of the 3 D printing available these days, I think I will go the route you did and leave the Cineroc itself untouched and for posterity.
The Omega on the other hand will be built and flown!

The nice thing about the 3D printed version is it has been designed as a drop in replacement for real Cineroc parts.  So, say you cracked the base of the aft transition (where the screw eye mounts to the camera).  You could remove the damaged aft transition, and glue in the 3D printed part (which has been reinforced against such damage) and fly your original again.

OR 

You want to fly an original film version with a look down perspective.  Swap out the nosecone (or the entire nosecone/camera body assembly) and go ahead.  This way you don't need to drill an authentic part.

The parts also have been designed with a pure digital video option that plugs the hole for the switch, and still keeps the camera body aligned with the camera.

Pointy Side Up!
Jim
.
NAR #100544

"The Guide says there is an art to flying", said Ford, "or rather a knack." 
"The knack lies in learning how to throw yourself at the ground and miss."

Launching is Optional... Landing? That Depends on Trees.

Reply
#9
When completed, the winning (and losing) contestants will be able to download the file and play along at home (no charge).

The nosecone, aft transition, and bulkhead have been signed off on. The shroud is back for another revision.
.
NAR #100544

"The Guide says there is an art to flying", said Ford, "or rather a knack." 
"The knack lies in learning how to throw yourself at the ground and miss."

Launching is Optional... Landing? That Depends on Trees.

Reply
#10
(07-10-2015, 02:47 AM)K Wrote: Now that classes are done, I'm working on the CinerocDV, and a clone of the Estes Omega (for the Community Competition).  Today I worked on the nosecones (seen in the post above)...  One is 40 years old (at least), and the other two are 3D printed copies.  Not bad eh?

Very impressive!  A few years ago I worked for a small product development company. We were playing with 3-D printers mostly, to test the feasibility of using them for prototyping, but the quality was pretty marginal. Very grainy surface finish.  But 2-3 years is a long time in a high-tech product's lifecycle. Looks like the technology is dramatically better. And I'm guessing you have a pretty decent printer. Ours were pretty basic, low-cost models. 

Would be fun to have one, but I'm probably more interested in getting my own laser engraver. We had an old Epilog, and I made a number of custom wooden rocket parts like centering rings and fins while I was there.
Lee
NAR 55948, L2
In Build: Mars Snooper
Next: upscale Sky Hook (Panavia kitbash)
In Finishing:  Estes Honest John, Red Nova, Super Cobra
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