Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Pringle's Can Rocketry
#1
Greetings:

Some years ago, I was looking into using household discards to build rocket parts.  I was financing my college education and money was tight.  I remember seeing pictures of Harry Stine building rockets from paper towel rolls and gift wrap paper core tubes in his first edition of the Handbook of Model Rocketry (1965).  Tube sizes were limited prior to 1964 and there was quite a bit of re-purposing of household items for tubes and carving of cones using a lathe.

In 1990s, I resurrected the paper towel tube rocket for youth camps.  At the turn of the century, I started using Pringle's cans.  For paper towel tubes, I used Easter Eggs for cones.  More recently, larger Easter Eggs were sold at Walmart that would fit onto a Pringle's can.  I still use the paper towel rolls for youth summer camps since they are easy to obtain.  I also buy Easter Eggs from Dollar Tree.  Other parts are made from drawing transitions from cardstock using a compass, balsa sheeting from Hobby Lobby, and paper straws from a party store.

For motor mounts, the rings are drawn using a compass and a meter stick and I hand roll the motor tubes and motor blocks around a motor case which serves as a mandrel.

End result--non-kit semi-scale models.  The image below is a Pringle's version of the Estes SPEV from the 1970s.


Attached Files Thumbnail(s)
   
Reply
#2
Back in 1977 I was a terror for any household tube. I built one rocket out of an aluminum foil tube with cardboard fins from a cereal box and a hand rolled nose cone with an escape tower made from a city chicken skewer. Twas fugly. The parachute was made from a Rainbo Bread bag. Shock cord was rubber bands scrounged from the mailman. A drinking straw was the launch lug. First launch from my backyard was from my homemade pad, a piece of wood with a straightened coathanger jammed in it. Unfortunately it wasn't straightened quite enough. I think the drinking straw lug came loose from the glue and the edge caught the kink in the rod. The backblast caught the deflector and deflected the flame at one of the fins. It literally burnt on the pad. My neighbor and his son were watching. Gary did everything in his power not to laugh in my face. Brian thought it was funny and wanted me to do it again. I didn't, but I swept up the mess before my Dad could get home and see it.
Reply
#3
Astrosaint, please make your photos larger—I can't appreciate your work when it's hard to see and that looks to be a nifty rocket.

Cool idea using a Pringles can. I like it when folks use what they can find. It eliminates a good bit of cost and there's the satisfaction of knowing that you built a rocket out of, what would be, trash. How can anyone not like that?

To carry on with Bill's thought; back in the day motors (at my LHS) came in tubes. Very conveniently sized tubes. I'd make "disposable" rockets. One shot wonders. The chip-board from a model box for fins, cross a couple of straight pins pushed through the body tube in an "X" to keep the motor from shooting through the tube and a rolled chip-board nose cone. Looked like a Chinese firework. Acted like one too. We had a milk can full of sulfur, a box of charcoaled wood and saltpeter could be had in any grocery store—you get my drift. Oh, yeah, a two by four and a straightened coat hanger with water-proof fuse. No need to paint'em as you knew you'd not be seeing them again.
Reply
#4
Rainbow 
(06-16-2015, 06:03 PM)foamy Wrote: Astrosaint, please make your photos larger—I can't appreciate your work when it's hard to see and that looks to be a nifty rocket.

Cool idea using a Pringles can. I like it when folks use what they can find. It eliminates a good bit of cost and there's the satisfaction of knowing that you built a rocket out of, what would be, trash. How can anyone not like that?


>>>>>I tried the get larger images uploaded by the Rocketry Center server did not cooperate.  I had an image of some paper towel rockets built by my students last July.  The site did not accept the images even after a few tries.  MMJR
Reply
#5
Astrosaint, they took mine when I shrank them down to "medium" (5/10) quality in Adobe photoshop.
Attach them as a file, but read the size of the file requirements before uploading.
They will appear as a thumbnail in your post, but when you click on them they enlarge nicely.
If you want them large, then host them on a site and link to them that way.
Greg Young - L3
TRA 00234
NAR 42065
Reply
#6
(06-16-2015, 06:03 PM)foamy Wrote: To carry on with Bill's thought; back in the day motors (at my LHS) came in tubes. Very conveniently sized tubes. I'd make "disposable" rockets. One shot wonders. The chip-board from a model box for fins, cross a couple of straight pins pushed through the body tube in an "X" to keep the motor from shooting through the tube and a rolled chip-board nose cone. Looked like a Chinese firework. Acted like one too. We had a milk can full of sulfur, a box of charcoaled wood and saltpeter could be had in any grocery store—you get my drift. Oh, yeah, a two by four and a straightened coat hanger with water-proof fuse. No need to paint'em as you knew you'd not be seeing them again.

We would quite laboriously unroll Inch-and-a-halfers, take the wick out, put it in the igniter hole of the motor, then empty the powder in over it and tamp it all down with the non-business end of an Ohio Blue Tip match.  Then we'd use the same match to light it.  I think I'll pick up some firecrackers and plan a launch like that in 2017 for my 40th anniversary. Cool
Reply
#7
Many of my non-disposable rockets met the same fate in the wide open desert. As much fun as they were to dispose of, I'd get more enjoyment from having them now. Well, maybe not as the surviving rockets disappeared in a move so they all would be gone anyway.
Member of MDRA, NAR and NARHAMS;
Level-2 certified but mostly fly G and under;
Volunteer compiler of manufacturer's news for ROCKETS Magazine.
Reply
#8
   

Hello:

I have enlarged the picture of my Pringle's Can version of the Estes 1975 vintage Spare Parts Elimination Vehicle (built from 1960s vintage Thor-Agena and Gemini Titan  leftover parts)

The rocket is very rare since it was never in regular production.  SPEVs allowed Estes to take surplus balsa transitions made for their old Thor Agena rocket kit and mate them to surplus Gemini Titan BT-70s.  The BT-70s never caught on in their kits and they had a warehouse load of them.

The Pringle's version used scraps of Pringle's cans, a Paper Towel tube, paper transitions, a section of BT50, rings, and a #8 cork painted in red. Cool
Reply
#9
Rainbow 
   
Greetings:

Here are 3 projects that I am assembling using Pringle's Cans.

Left--I have a single Pringle's can with commercially made BT-60 and a Gemini nosecone from BMS.  Think of a Saturn 1st stage and an lengthened Titan-1 with capsule on top.

Center--two "Long" Pringle's cans glued end to end. One got bent on the way home from the grocer (crushing many chips).  I straightened it out and wrapped some thin cardboard to repair the damaged section.

Right-- A Saturn C-5x (there were a number of configurations on the table in 1961).  It is ready for painting.  The upper tube is a paper towel roll section.

I peel off both the aluminum inside of the tube and then peel the color paper that is on the outside very carefully with a hobby knife.  The surface is perfect for acrylic brush paint.  This keeps the rocket kid friendly; no spray paint on everything except the rocket.

I also use a band of thin cardstock to cover the seam between the 2 joined cans.

I usually install a 24 mm mount for C-E motors.  For the rocket on the right, I will use a cluster of 3 As to clear out my surplus . Cool

A.
Reply
#10
Very cool projects, Astrosaint. Will you be bringing these to the August R.O.C.K.?
Living life dangerously...launching C's on a B field.
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)