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Pringle's Can Rocketry
#21
(07-27-2015, 05:20 PM)Kirk G Wrote: Question for the Pringle Can builders:

All the Pringle Cans that I find/buy/use all have a metal ring at the top or bottom of the can.

1) How do you attach two cans together? Epoxy works well for this
2) How do you attach a nosecone? Hand rolled? It varies depending on what you decide to use as a NC.
3) what do you use for a nosecone if not hand rolled? I have seen some folks use tennis balls, plastic funnels, etc. You are limited only by your imagination! Smile
4) Is it not a violation of NAR guidelines to have those metal rings still on/in the rockets? As has been already posted, no.

Thanks for honest answers.
Interest is sincere.
Greg Young - L3
TRA 00234
NAR 42065
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#22
(07-28-2015, 07:07 AM)Greg Young Wrote:
(07-27-2015, 05:20 PM)Kirk G Wrote: Question for the Pringle Can builders:

Here are some answers to these questions. I was in Germany when this post appeared and could not reply.

All the Pringle Cans that I find/buy/use all have a metal ring at the top or bottom of the can.-----Just cut them off

1) How do you attach two cans together?        Epoxy works well for this-----better to use cardstock to make a coupler and joint the tubes together using wood glue.  Epoxy is both overkill and toxic to use.

2) How do you attach a nosecone? Hand rolled? It varies depending on what you decide to use as a NC.--Paper cones, transitions to standard rocket tubes with nosecones, the choices are limited only by the imagination.

3) what do you use for a nosecone if not hand rolled?   I have seen some folks use tennis balls, plastic funnels, etc. You are limited only by your imagination! Smile   ---Agreed


4) Is it not a violation of NAR guidelines to have those metal rings still on/in the rockets?    As has been already posted,  no.

Thanks for honest answers.
Interest is sincere.



Astrosaint   Angel
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#23
If you cut off the metal rings, wood glue will certainly work. Assuming you want to keep the rings intact, epoxy is a much better choice.
The garden variety Bob smith type you can get in hardware etc stores will work do the job.
As far as being toxic, as long as you wear gloves to avoid sensitization, and have decent ventilation, you will have no worries.
Most solvents and thinners are significantly more toxic when inhaled than epoxies..
Greg
Greg Young - L3
TRA 00234
NAR 42065
Reply
#24
Someone had one of these at a recent club meeting. 

[Image: Cover_preview_featured.jpg]


http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:887300/

He hasn't launched it yet. When he does he is not going to use the included "launch pad" nor the suggested ignition method (fireworks fuse!). 

The fins are very thin, probably should be made thicker.
Rich Holmes
Camillus, NY
Secretary / newsletter editor
Syracuse Rocket Club

http://richsrockets.wordpress.com
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#25
I love the looks of that rocket Rich, thanks for posting it! Smile
Greg Young - L3
TRA 00234
NAR 42065
Reply
#26
Greetings:

I response to the question of toxicity to epoxy,  it is a gradual process that seems to start when you are young, foolish, and do not have the money to procure polypropylene gloves and an OSHA mask.  The compounds in the hardener bio accumulates in the human body until there is a reaction.  Asthma is a reaction.  I have a worse problem.

If any of the hardener touches my skin, the skin just dissolves like it was exposed to hydro-sulfuric acid.  When I went to the doctor with fingers reduced to just lowest level tissue covering bone, he almost shipped me off to a hospital burn ward.  Enough skin survived to limit treatment to one month of burn cream and bandages until the skin regenerated.

NOW I KNOW BETTER.  Epoxy should never be used unless it is absolutely required.

Angel Astrosaint NAR 34611
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#27
While I am sorry to learn of your sensitization issues Astrosaint, you are certainly not alone.
That being said there are some facts folks need to understand with dealing with epoxy, which is only one of a  number of chemicals the average home owner may have stored that can result in health issues if not properly handled. Examples include solvents, insecticides, herbicides, chemical cleaning agents, etc. The list goes on…
Regarding epoxies, here are some facts:
1) as many as 10% of those handling epoxies that don't wear appropriate gloves can develop dermatitis, either contact or eczematous, over time. The gloves that should be used are the nitrile, or nitrile butatoluene types only. The others don't offer the same degree of protection. 
2) true allergic reactions (pulmonary i.e. asthma etc.) occur in as many as 2% over time. They are much more likely to occur following exposure to the low molecular weight epoxy resins used in paints and coating materials rather than the higher molecular weight resin systems used for bonding. They are seen with a higher incidence in those with previous/family history of allergies.
3) the sensitizer for dermatitis has been shown in clinical studies to be the uncured resin.
4) if someone is sensitive to epoxies, or they are worried about possibly becoming sensitive, they should consider avoiding the following products which demonstrate varying levels of uncured epoxy resins in their formulation: vinyl/plastic handbags, gloves and jewelry; dental bonding; adhesive tapes; electrical insulation; floor/wall panel coverings; inks; laminates; PVC products; varnishes; twist off bottle caps; brass door handles; and a significant issue these days - Bisphenyl A (a component of resin systems) which can be found in minute quantities leaching out from plastic containers into foods and liquids contained therein. These include unfortunately plastic baby bottles. Consider how ubiquitous this plastic container issue is these days, as so many folks drink from the thin plastic bottles containing "spring water" in an effort to maintain hydration.
If used without proper care one can become sensitized to epoxies. If that occurs, it’s a life-long issue.
Bottom line, with proper attention in the use of epoxies, the same attention that we should be focusing on all of the other toxic chemical compounds we are routinely exposed to, they can be safely used.
As with anything, use them for the proper indications.
Greg
Greg Young - L3
TRA 00234
NAR 42065
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