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Paper Towel Rocketry (was Pringle's Can R.)
#1
   

Greetings:

On my Mac, I do not have Photoshop XX--that piece of software costs more than the entire computer system itself!

Anyhow, I shrunk the image from 2.3 megs to .594 megs.  let me test this out.

My limit is 500K, the image started out at 2.3 meg.  After cropping and conversion to .gif, it is now 134k or so.

The rockets were from my summer camp in 2014.  The rockets are 8 inches of paper towel tube with a transition to a 18 mm motor mount.  The vehicles look like FAI style S1 vehicles.  I used this shape to allow A8-3s to be used for the camp.  The nosecones were Easter eggs taped to a section of paper towel tube cut and slit to fit inside the main fuselage.  A/C Chrome tape strips hold the egg to the shoulder.  An Estes style shock cord mount attaches the cone assembly to the rest of the rocket.  The rocket all flew well and climbed up to 150 feet or so.  Not bad for a relatively fat "A" rocket.
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#2
Brings back memories! Back in the day, there wasn't as wide an assortment of non-rocketry tubes to scavenge. I used a lot of paper towel tubes and even some TP tubes.
Member of MDRA, NAR and NARHAMS;
Level-2 certified but mostly fly G and under;
Volunteer compiler of manufacturer's news for ROCKETS Magazine.
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#3
Among the scant few relics that I still have from my "discovery period" of the hobby are the body tube and one fin from the first non-rocketry tube that I got flying, the Phantom Cruiser. The tube was possibly from an aluminum foil or waxed paper roll, and the fin is from a cereal box. The nose cone was a homemade cockpit design that I carved out of a chunk of balsa that I got at a hobby pack from Kay Bee Toy & Hobby. It looked like a long, humped birds beak. Far be it from me to take any time sanding. I just hacked away with my pocket knife. I don't remember how I did the motor mount, but it flew like a bat out of hell on a C6-5. I flew it three times at the local park with one pack, then bought another pack after we moved only to have it splatter itself under power against the side of the church at the top of the street. The other two C6-5s from that pack powered my Estes Wizard and Estes X-Ray on their fateful flights.
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#4
   

Greetings:

I will be conducting a rocket build and launch for the Town of Astatula , Florida July 13-15, 2015.  It is the second annual "Astatula Rocket Days" to commemmorate the Landing of Apollo 11 on July 20th, 1969.  It is a free event for the children of the town.

I keeping with the paper towel theme, I have designed the SaturnEZ rocket from paper towel tubing, an Easter Egg, cardboard box rings, balsa/craft sticks, and a group of 7 BT-20s.

I also have Pringle's Can rockets to fly.  I use paper towel tubing for stuffer tubes in those.  I will add an image on the Pringle's can thread.

A.
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#5
Your Saturn EZ is a clever build.. nice work! Smile
Greg Young - L3
TRA 00234
NAR 42065
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#6
(07-12-2015, 01:07 PM)Astrosaint Wrote: I also have Pringle's Can rockets to fly.  I use paper towel tubing for stuffer tubes in those.  I will add an image on the Pringle's can thread.

A.

Forgive my ignorance, but what is a "stuffer tube" and how does one use paper towel tubing for flying a pringle can?  Or do I misunderstand? Angel
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#7
A stuffer tube is a smaller diameter tube inside a large body tube, a continuation of the motor mount tube; its chief purpose is to reduce the amount of volume the ejection charge needs to pressurize. A Pringles can isn't so large that I would think a stuffer tube would be necessary, but I've been wrong once or twice before.
Rich Holmes
Camillus, NY
Secretary / newsletter editor
Syracuse Rocket Club

http://richsrockets.wordpress.com
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#8
(08-10-2015, 07:15 PM)Rich Holmes Wrote: A stuffer tube is a smaller diameter tube inside a large body tube, a continuation of the motor mount tube; its chief purpose is to reduce the amount of volume the ejection charge needs to pressurize. A Pringles can isn't so large that I would think a stuffer tube would be necessary, but I've been wrong once or twice before.

I wouldn't have thought a stuffer was needed for a single can rocket. If you stack a few, maybe. Especially if using 18mm motors.
Member of MDRA, NAR and NARHAMS;
Level-2 certified but mostly fly G and under;
Volunteer compiler of manufacturer's news for ROCKETS Magazine.
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#9
(08-10-2015, 07:31 PM)rstaff3 Wrote:
(08-10-2015, 07:15 PM)Rich Holmes Wrote: A stuffer tube is a smaller diameter tube inside a large body tube, a continuation of the motor mount tube; its chief purpose is to reduce the amount of volume the ejection charge needs to pressurize. A Pringles can isn't so large that I would think a stuffer tube would be necessary, but I've been wrong once or twice before.

I wouldn't have thought a stuffer was needed for a single can rocket. If you stack a few, maybe. Especially if using 18mm motors.

I use a stuffer tube in most Pringle's can rockets because the volume inside is quite large even if you use a single can.  I often use 2 long cans.

Manuel Mejia, Jr. NAR 34611 Angel
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#10
I'd be stuffing a 29mm mount in one...no problem Smile need to see if my kids ever eat these...now I want a few Wink
Member of MDRA, NAR and NARHAMS;
Level-2 certified but mostly fly G and under;
Volunteer compiler of manufacturer's news for ROCKETS Magazine.
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